Outlander the musical ?

DIANA Gabaldon revealed she was once in talks about an Outlander musical – and would one day like to see it hit the stage.

The author was approached by Aberdeen playwright Mike Gibb about making a live version of her books.

She says: “Mike came to me in 2009 as he had it in mind to do an Outlander musical. Some of the songs were really very good. But at that point my agent did the deal with Sony which took two years of negotiations.

“So we had to suspend the musical at that point. I retained my musical drama rights to the books, but there’s a hold-back period in the contract for several years.”

She adds: “But we are approaching that point again where we can consider doing a musical, so we will look around at that then and see where we are.”

However, some of Diana’s followers go to painful lengths to show their devotion.

She said: “I’ve been asked to sign people’s arms with a Sharpie, which they then go and have tattooed on their skin.

“One woman waited for hours to be in line at a book signing. She then took off her shoe and her stocking to show me the tattoo on her foot.

“It was of the running stag brooch that was on the front cover of my book The Fiery Cross on the US and Canadian editions.

“I was like, ‘Well that looks painful.’ She then gave me a Polaroid photo of her foot as a memento.”

Blackness castle ,DIANA Gabaldon writer of Outlander
Blackness Castle

And other followers have left her feeling flushed with success.

She adds: “Someone asked me a question online about the books and it was going to be quite a complicated answer.

“I replied, ‘I will be happy to answer that later as right now I only have two brain cells left and one of those is trying to remember to buy toilet paper.’

“A few days later a big FedEx truck pulls up next to my house and decants 200 rolls of toilet paper from all around the world.

“There was Korean, Japanese, Australian and a lot from the US as well. The Korean toilet paper was pretty cute as it had images of bees on it.”

Then there are the mickey-takes, with Diana left tickled by Burnistoun’s Outlander sketch which featured Jamie McShagger from The Clan McShagger on the new BBC Scotland channel last month.

She laughed: “That was very funny but I’ve seen a lot of parodies of Outlander now. Fans film their own ones too.”

But her followers will be delighted to know that after she completes her 10-part main series she plans to keep Outlander going with a string of potential spin-offs and a prequel.

She joked: “I will die sooner or later, although I think I can make it through to the tenth book.

“But the Outlander effect is now totally outwith my control.

Caitrina Balfe nominated for Golden Globe

The 39-year-old actress received her fourth Golden Globes nomination on Thursday, for Best Actress in a Drama Series for her role as Claire Randall on “Outlander”. When the annual awards show airs live from Los Angeles next month, Balfe will go up against Elisabeth Moss (“The Handmaid’s Tale”), Sandra Oh (“Killing Eve”), Julia Roberts (“Homecoming”) and Keri Russell (“The Americans”).

Shortly after the Hollywood Foreign Press Association revealed the full list of this year’s honorees, Balfe took to Twitter to react to the exciting news.

“Wow, thoroughly shocked and completely ecstatic to hear I am among the nominees for this years @goldenglobes,” Balfe, who was also nominated in the same category in 2016, 2017 and 2018, tweeted. “A HUGE thank you to the HFPA for their continued support and a HUGE congratulations to Julia, Elizabeth, Sandra and Keri, I am beyond proud to be in your company.”

“Mostly, thank you to my incredible fellow actors and the wonderful team of writers, producers and crew on @Outlander_STARZ that push me to my best,” she added. “#GoldenGlobeAwards.”

Wow, thoroughly shocked and completely ecstatic to hear I am among the nominees for this years @goldenglobes A HUGE thank you to the HFPA for their continued support and a HUGE congratulations to Julia, Elizabeth, Sandra and Keri, I am beyond proud to be in your company. But 1/2

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Wow, thoroughly shocked and completely ecstatic to hear I am among the nominees for this years @goldenglobes A HUGE thank you to the HFPA for their continued support and a HUGE congratulations to Julia, Elizabeth, Sandra and Keri, I am beyond proud to be in your company. But 1/2

Mostly, thank you to my incredible fellow actors and the wonderful team of writers, producers and crew on @Outlander_STARZ that push me to my best. #GoldenGlobeAwards

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Although Balfe’s “Outlander” co-star, Sam Heughan, wasn’t nominated for his own Golden Globe, he couldn’t be happier for his onscreen wife.

“CONGRATS LOVELY!!!!!” he gushed on Twitter. “So deserved and what a catagory [sic]. Or should I say Caitagory… #BalfeForTheWin.”

CONGRATS LOVELY!!!!! So deserved and what a catagory. Or should I say Caitagory… #BalfeForTheWin

Congratulations to @caitrionambalfe on her @goldenglobes nomination for Best Actress in a TV Series, Drama for #Outlander! We are so proud.

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Breaking news – Sam Heughan auditioned for James Bond

If you’ve seen the red-haired Sam Heughan on Amazon’s Outlander, then you’ll know that he’s the ultimate action man. It’s perhaps not that surprising then, that he Sam Heughan auditioned for James Bond. He’s been thrust back in time in Outlander and forced into the pressure zone on Doctors, so did the Bond producers miss a trick in opting for Daniel Craig?

“I did audition for Bond a long time ago when they were redoing it with Daniel Craig when he was Bond 21,” Heughan confessed on U.S. show Live With Kelly and Ryan, the Radio Times reports. His appearance was ahead of the fourth season of Outlander, which sees Heughan playing Jamie Fraser, an 18th century Scottish warrior who steals the heart of Claire (played by Catriona Balfe), as well as just about everyone watching at home. So, maybe count your blessings. If Heughan had landed the Die Another Day role, he might not have become the sexy Scottish warrior you thirst over today.

It’s not just the role of James Bond that Heughan’s had bad luck with. As he told Vulture back in 2014, he tried auditioning for Game of Thrones a whopping seven times before settling into his Scottish warrior role. “I auditioned for Renly, Loras,some of the members of the Night’s Watch. And I’d always get so close! I’d be like, ‘Guys, just give me a sword!'” While he didn’t get Bond’s gun or martini, nor Jon Snow’s Longclaw sword, he did finally get a sword when he joined Outlander.

Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images News/Getty Images

He revealed in the same interview that he did feel an affinity to Jamie Fraser, as he gushed:

“Something about this one just felt right. This part felt different. I knew this character. I felt a connection with him. I knew where he had come from.”

Even though I’m unable to think of an actor better suited to the role of Fraser (Gerard Butler, maybe?), the pundits — and the actor himself — aren’t letting go of the idea that Heughan could be the next Bond. “I’ve always wanted to play James Bond. It’s a part of every British actor’s legacy,” he told the Sunday Post back in July.

As the Sunday Post also reported, Heughan’s odds to play 007 were once a beefy 50/1, but those were slashed when he played a spoof spy role alongside Mila Kunis in The Spy Who Dumped Me, which was released in the UK back in July. “Are you really in the running for James Bond? Please say yes,” he was asked by a fan during a Facebook Live interview back in July, as The Scottish Sun reported. “Well if you would like me to, of course I will. I feel like I’ve got the tuxedo and I’ve got the car from this movie so I could just take them with me,” he reportedly answered, referring to his role in The Spy Who Dumped Me. We all know about Bond’s deep Scottish roots, so it wouldn’t be any surprise if Jamie becomes James ( Bond , James Bond )

Appeal started for century-old fishing boat that played a star role in Outlander

An appeal has been launched to complete the restoration of a unique century-old fishing boat that played a star role in time-shift drama Outlander.

Outlander news from Outlander tours Scotland .

reaper Outlander tours Scotland
Reaper – Outlander tours Scotland

Reaper is the last surviving Scottish herring lugger, or Fifie, and one of the few National Historic Ships fleet that has been kept in a seagoing condition. Reaper, with its distinctive red sail, is emblematic of the east coast herring industry. Built around 1901-03, the 70ft vessel has been the flagship of the Scottish Fisheries Museum in Fife for more than 40 years. The vessel has itself served as a floating museum, touring more than 50 ports across the UK and hosting more than 180,000 visitors.

But despite a series of repairs and refits over the years, major work has been required to keep Reaper seaworthy and its condition has been found to be worse than anticipated. And despite a £500,000 grant from the Scottish Government last year, an extra £25,000 is required to finish the job at the Babcock yard in Rosyth that started last November. It is hoped this will be completed next June so Reaper can make a triumphant return home to mark the Anstruther museum’s 50th birthday by leading a flotilla of historic boats down the Forth.

Museum director of operations Ian Goodyear said: “Reaper is hugely significant boat for the nation. In 2015, it was realised the boat required an extensive renovation to preserve it for the next 30 years and continue its outreach programme. Due to the nature of the vessel, it now requires even more work than was first surveyed and further funds are required to complete phase one.” Work will include renewing the hull timbers and replacing those on the deck, using larch from the same north-east forest whose wood was used in its construction at Sandhaven, near Fraserburgh.

Reaper, with its distinctive red sail, played a key role in Outlander as the boat used by central characters Claire and Jamie to escape to France. Chris Oliver, a retired surgeon who has become a volunteer at the museum’s boatyard that will complete phase two, said: “Reaper is sorely missed and we are always asked when it is coming back. “These historic boats were such an important part of the local fishing communities.” Phase two will include painting and fitting out a new cabin. Some 10-20 per cent of the original boat will be retained.

Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/regions/edinburgh-fife-lothians/outlander-boat-reaper-needs-another-25k-to-keep-seaworthy-1-4800560

Outlander series 4 trailer

The full trailer for Outlander season 4 is here. Starring Sam Heughan and Caitriona Balfe as star-crossed lovers, Jamie and Claire, the historical time travel series is based on Diana Gabaldon’s series of novels of the same name. Debuting in 2014, the show has slowly built its own fan community who are passionate about what comes next for the couple. After nine months since its third season wrapped up, the rollout of this brand new look is proof that Droughtlander is nearly over and loyal viewers cannot be more thrilled.

outlander series 4 trailer

Watch the Outlander series 4 trailer here .

Season 4 will mine narrative inspiration from Gabaldon’s fourth book titled Drums of Autumn which follows Jamie and Claire to the American colonies. It can be remembered that season 3 ended with the two washed up in Georgia after surviving the shipwreck.  Initially hoping that they’ll be able to build a better life in their new location, the couple will settle at River Run, the home of Jamie’s Aunt Jocasta (Marie Doyle Kennedy). Unfortunately, little did they know that fresh danger awaits them, and with no trusted ally, they find themselves having no one to rely on but each other.

lallybroch castle tours

Lallybroch castle, ancestral home of Jamie Fraser . Outlander tours

 

Posted on Starz’s official YouTube account is the official trailer for Outlander season 4. It follows the release of a first-look teaser back in July and includes several of the scenes that were previously shown, as well as never-before-seen sequences from the upcoming outing. However, the biggest takeaway from the clip is Bree, played by Sophie Skelton (who is still in the 1900s and getting closer to Roger, played by Richard Rankin), in Craigh na Dun getting ready to travel back in time. Watch the full video above.

Since the emotional season 2 finale where Jamie had to send a pregnant Claire to her own timeline before the Battle of Culloden began, fans have been eagerly waiting for him to meet his daughter. Despite having not met, Jamie knows what Bree looks like thanks to the photos Claire brought with her when she went back in time to look for her Scottish lover. Readers of Gabaldon’s books know how significant it is in the overall story (not to mention emotional) when the two finally see each other face-to-face. Luckily, fans won’t have to wait for too long since it’s confirmed that the much-anticipated meeting will take place sometime in the upcoming outing. It’ll be curious to know, however, if Starz has any plans of changing elements of their encounter. For the most part, the people behind the series have been doing a good job in closely following the books, which is greatly appreciated by those who were fans of the novels first.

Whether Jamie and Brianna meet early or late in the season, fans won’t have to worry that there won’t be enough time to explore their eventual relationship. Outlander scored another two season-renewal (12 episodes each) back in May which means that at least The Fiery Cross and A Breath of Snow and Ashes will be translated to the small screen.

Outlander author Diana Gabaldon talks about her favourite books and writing methods

The Great American Read, hosted by TV personality and journalist Meredith Vieira, is an eight-part TV competition shining a national spotlight on the importance of reading and will feature an interview with Diana Gabaldon,   best known for her Outlander series of novels and the STARZ TV series derived from it.

Outlander news from Outlander tours .

In fact, the TV series returned Outlander to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times best seller list 23 years after it was first published.

Doune castle tours
Once a Royal residence, Doune Castle was rebuilt by Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany in the late 14th Century.

Gabaldon, who is currently working on the ninth book in the series, appeared at PBS’ summer TCA session for The Great American Read. Following is a bit of what she had to say.

What was it like when you found out you made the list?

I said, “Who else is on this list?”

Is your favorite book on the list?

Trying to pick one favorite book out of the universe of books is impossible. Trying to pick one off of a list of 100 is difficult but maybe not impossible. It’s a dead heat between Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Lonesome Dove. Having made that decision, I was thinking: What do these books have in common? Why do I like them both so much? I finally decided that it’s because they share what my husband refers to in reference to my work as the “One damn thing after another” school of fiction.

What book or books really changed the way you thought?

My dad at one phase of his career was an elementary school principal. And his elementary school held a book sale — it was a very active school and all the parents brought in books by the ton — which he collected in this little janitorial room. Just before the book sale, he would let my mother, my sister and me into that room with an empty cardboard box each. We brought back the books that we had taken last year and added them to the pile, but we extracted new ones. When I was about 15, I filled my box halfway with the paperbacks that had the covers ripped off and I found out why.

What are you reading right now?

I’m in one of those phases where I’m reading four books at once because I’m actively working on the ninth book of my main series, and so I’m rereading Dorothy Sayers‘ The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery for probably the 80th time, because I love the series and the characters, but it’s a book I can step in and out of. I can put it down when it’s time to go to work myself. But I’m also running a nonfiction book in the background that I’m reading for general interest. Then, I’m also rereading parts of my own eighth book Written in My Own Heart’s Blood because I’m working on the ninth book, and there are pieces where I encounter an emotional thread that I had dropped in the last book. So, I will go back to read through it and pick that up so it will come into the new book with its original power.

When you were first writing Outlander, did you start with the love story or did you start off with the mythic quality of the show?

Neither one. I don’t write in a straight line and I don’t plan stories out ahead of time. In fact, I don’t actually know what’s going to happen in a book.

I began writing Outlander for practice. I knew I was supposed to be a novelist, but I didn’t know how; and I decided the way to learn was to actually write a novel. So, Outlander was my practice book. I was never going to show it to anyone, so it didn’t matter what I did with it. It didn’t have to have a genre, so I used anything that I like. I’ve been reading since I was a 3-year-old. I like a lot of stuff, so I used it all.

Now that Outlander has been adapted, does the image of the actors supersede in your own minds, or maybe in your readers’ minds, the characters as written?

I know that for a number of readers, because they say so on my Facebook page and so forth, the vision of the actors does, in fact, supersede their original vision of what the characters looked like. It doesn’t for me. They still look the same way they always looked.

That said, what an actor does is magic. It’s pretty much what we do but in a different venue. Their magic is to embody somebody that they aren’t. The first time I saw Sam Heughan, though, they sent me his audition tape for Jamie Fraser, and I was looking up his pictures on my way to wherever I was going, and he has a very limited filmography, not many pictures, and, frankly, the ones that he had up were strange.

Anyway, so, when I saw the audition, I didn’t know what to expect. He appeared, and five seconds into it, I was saying, “He doesn’t look anything like his photos. He looks fine.” Five seconds more, he was gone, and it was just Jamie Fraser right there. I recognized him immediately.

How did your story get discovered and championed?

Well, it’s actually extremely humdrum. The only novel thing about it was that in 1988, the internet basically didn’t exist except for a few small special interest groups, CompuServe, Delfi, GEnie, but owing to various career choices I had made, I was an “expert in scientific computation,” and I was in that world. I had discovered a group of people called the Literary Forum on CompuServe. This was not a writers’ group. This was just people who liked to talk about books. There were a few writers there, though.

I had always known I was supposed to be novelist, and when I was 36, I said, “Well, you better start writing a novel, then.” Actually what I said was “Mozart was dead at 36. You better get started.” So I did. I was not going to tell the people that I knew on CompuServe what I was doing for various reasons, and I didn’t. But one night I was having an argument with a gentleman online about what it feels like to be pregnant.

He said, “I know what that’s like. My wife’s had three children.” I laughed, and I said, “Yeah, Buster. I’ve had three children.” He said, “Can you tell me what it’s like?” I said, “I can, yes, but it’s kind of complex. I can’t fit it in a 30‑line message slot.” I said, “I have this little thing I wrote a few months ago in which a young woman explains to her brother in some detail what it’s like to be pregnant. I’ll put it in the library here for you.” My husband says I am congenitally unable to lose an argument, and he’s right. That’s why I overcame my fear of showing what I was writing, in order to win an argument, and I did, as a matter of fact, win the argument.

But what happened was that everyone who had been following the argument went and read this piece, and they all came rushing back, and they said, “This is great. What is it?” And I said, “I don’t know.” They said, “Well, where’s the beginning?” I said, “I haven’t written that yet.” And they said, “Well, put up some more of it. This is fascinating.”

I don’t write in a straight line. I write in little bits and fit them together. Whenever I had a bit that would stand alone without too much discussion, I put it up. And people got more and more interested. They said, “This is great. Diana has a new chunk. Have you read it?” This was my first experience with the power of word of mouth, also the power of giving out free samples, which I have employed ever since.

And essentially what happened is that I was introduced to an agent who I had my eye on by a CompuServe friend who was this man’s client as well, and he said, “You’re almost ready to look for an agent. Would you like me to introduce you to so and so?” And I said, “Yes.” I wasn’t finished writing the book, but I was afraid my friend would be run over by a bus or leave CompuServe, so I said, “Yeah. Go ahead and ask him.”

So he wrote a perfectly straightforward typed letter to Perry Knowlton, who was the agent. Perry, God rest his soul, was a much older gentleman who never touched a computer in his life. So, I followed up my friend’s note with my own query letter. Mind you, my book was still not done. It said, “Dear, Mr. Knowlton, I’ve been writing and selling nonfiction by myself for several years. But now that I’m working on a novel, I understand that I need good literary representation. You’ve been recommended to me by John and these other people who all think you walk on water.” I said, “I have this very long book. I don’t want to waste your time reading it, it’s a long historical novel. Would you be willing to read excerpts from it?” I didn’t tell him it wasn’t done. Excerpts were all I had.

He very kindly called me back and gave me a heart attack and said, yes, he would read my excerpts. So, I hastily wrote a 26‑page single spaced synopsis of what I thought I knew about the rest of the story and sent it with my bundle of excerpts, and he took me. It is not usual to buy an unfinished book as a first novel, but I was very lucky. I actually finished the book six months later, gave it to him, and he sent it to five editors who he thought might like it. Within four days, three of them had called back with offers to buy it. So, he negotiated amongst them for two weeks. He emerged with a three‑book contract, and bing, I was a novelist. Like I said, it’s very humdrum.

New episodes of The Great American Read premiere September 11 through October 23 on PBS. Voting opened with the launch of the two-hour premiere episode on May 22 and continues throughout the summer, leading up to the grand finale on October 23.

Outlander tours