Outlander series 4 trailer

The full trailer for Outlander season 4 is here. Starring Sam Heughan and Caitriona Balfe as star-crossed lovers, Jamie and Claire, the historical time travel series is based on Diana Gabaldon’s series of novels of the same name. Debuting in 2014, the show has slowly built its own fan community who are passionate about what comes next for the couple. After nine months since its third season wrapped up, the rollout of this brand new look is proof that Droughtlander is nearly over and loyal viewers cannot be more thrilled.

outlander series 4 trailer

Watch the Outlander series 4 trailer here .

Season 4 will mine narrative inspiration from Gabaldon’s fourth book titled Drums of Autumn which follows Jamie and Claire to the American colonies. It can be remembered that season 3 ended with the two washed up in Georgia after surviving the shipwreck.  Initially hoping that they’ll be able to build a better life in their new location, the couple will settle at River Run, the home of Jamie’s Aunt Jocasta (Marie Doyle Kennedy). Unfortunately, little did they know that fresh danger awaits them, and with no trusted ally, they find themselves having no one to rely on but each other.

lallybroch castle tours

Lallybroch castle, ancestral home of Jamie Fraser . Outlander tours

 

Posted on Starz’s official YouTube account is the official trailer for Outlander season 4. It follows the release of a first-look teaser back in July and includes several of the scenes that were previously shown, as well as never-before-seen sequences from the upcoming outing. However, the biggest takeaway from the clip is Bree, played by Sophie Skelton (who is still in the 1900s and getting closer to Roger, played by Richard Rankin), in Craigh na Dun getting ready to travel back in time. Watch the full video above.

Since the emotional season 2 finale where Jamie had to send a pregnant Claire to her own timeline before the Battle of Culloden began, fans have been eagerly waiting for him to meet his daughter. Despite having not met, Jamie knows what Bree looks like thanks to the photos Claire brought with her when she went back in time to look for her Scottish lover. Readers of Gabaldon’s books know how significant it is in the overall story (not to mention emotional) when the two finally see each other face-to-face. Luckily, fans won’t have to wait for too long since it’s confirmed that the much-anticipated meeting will take place sometime in the upcoming outing. It’ll be curious to know, however, if Starz has any plans of changing elements of their encounter. For the most part, the people behind the series have been doing a good job in closely following the books, which is greatly appreciated by those who were fans of the novels first.

Whether Jamie and Brianna meet early or late in the season, fans won’t have to worry that there won’t be enough time to explore their eventual relationship. Outlander scored another two season-renewal (12 episodes each) back in May which means that at least The Fiery Cross and A Breath of Snow and Ashes will be translated to the small screen.

Outlander author Diana Gabaldon talks about her favourite books and writing methods

The Great American Read, hosted by TV personality and journalist Meredith Vieira, is an eight-part TV competition shining a national spotlight on the importance of reading and will feature an interview with Diana Gabaldon,   best known for her Outlander series of novels and the STARZ TV series derived from it.

Outlander news from Outlander tours .

In fact, the TV series returned Outlander to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times best seller list 23 years after it was first published.

Doune castle tours
Once a Royal residence, Doune Castle was rebuilt by Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany in the late 14th Century.

Gabaldon, who is currently working on the ninth book in the series, appeared at PBS’ summer TCA session for The Great American Read. Following is a bit of what she had to say.

What was it like when you found out you made the list?

I said, “Who else is on this list?”

Is your favorite book on the list?

Trying to pick one favorite book out of the universe of books is impossible. Trying to pick one off of a list of 100 is difficult but maybe not impossible. It’s a dead heat between Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Lonesome Dove. Having made that decision, I was thinking: What do these books have in common? Why do I like them both so much? I finally decided that it’s because they share what my husband refers to in reference to my work as the “One damn thing after another” school of fiction.

What book or books really changed the way you thought?

My dad at one phase of his career was an elementary school principal. And his elementary school held a book sale — it was a very active school and all the parents brought in books by the ton — which he collected in this little janitorial room. Just before the book sale, he would let my mother, my sister and me into that room with an empty cardboard box each. We brought back the books that we had taken last year and added them to the pile, but we extracted new ones. When I was about 15, I filled my box halfway with the paperbacks that had the covers ripped off and I found out why.

What are you reading right now?

I’m in one of those phases where I’m reading four books at once because I’m actively working on the ninth book of my main series, and so I’m rereading Dorothy Sayers‘ The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery for probably the 80th time, because I love the series and the characters, but it’s a book I can step in and out of. I can put it down when it’s time to go to work myself. But I’m also running a nonfiction book in the background that I’m reading for general interest. Then, I’m also rereading parts of my own eighth book Written in My Own Heart’s Blood because I’m working on the ninth book, and there are pieces where I encounter an emotional thread that I had dropped in the last book. So, I will go back to read through it and pick that up so it will come into the new book with its original power.

When you were first writing Outlander, did you start with the love story or did you start off with the mythic quality of the show?

Neither one. I don’t write in a straight line and I don’t plan stories out ahead of time. In fact, I don’t actually know what’s going to happen in a book.

I began writing Outlander for practice. I knew I was supposed to be a novelist, but I didn’t know how; and I decided the way to learn was to actually write a novel. So, Outlander was my practice book. I was never going to show it to anyone, so it didn’t matter what I did with it. It didn’t have to have a genre, so I used anything that I like. I’ve been reading since I was a 3-year-old. I like a lot of stuff, so I used it all.

Now that Outlander has been adapted, does the image of the actors supersede in your own minds, or maybe in your readers’ minds, the characters as written?

I know that for a number of readers, because they say so on my Facebook page and so forth, the vision of the actors does, in fact, supersede their original vision of what the characters looked like. It doesn’t for me. They still look the same way they always looked.

That said, what an actor does is magic. It’s pretty much what we do but in a different venue. Their magic is to embody somebody that they aren’t. The first time I saw Sam Heughan, though, they sent me his audition tape for Jamie Fraser, and I was looking up his pictures on my way to wherever I was going, and he has a very limited filmography, not many pictures, and, frankly, the ones that he had up were strange.

Anyway, so, when I saw the audition, I didn’t know what to expect. He appeared, and five seconds into it, I was saying, “He doesn’t look anything like his photos. He looks fine.” Five seconds more, he was gone, and it was just Jamie Fraser right there. I recognized him immediately.

How did your story get discovered and championed?

Well, it’s actually extremely humdrum. The only novel thing about it was that in 1988, the internet basically didn’t exist except for a few small special interest groups, CompuServe, Delfi, GEnie, but owing to various career choices I had made, I was an “expert in scientific computation,” and I was in that world. I had discovered a group of people called the Literary Forum on CompuServe. This was not a writers’ group. This was just people who liked to talk about books. There were a few writers there, though.

I had always known I was supposed to be novelist, and when I was 36, I said, “Well, you better start writing a novel, then.” Actually what I said was “Mozart was dead at 36. You better get started.” So I did. I was not going to tell the people that I knew on CompuServe what I was doing for various reasons, and I didn’t. But one night I was having an argument with a gentleman online about what it feels like to be pregnant.

He said, “I know what that’s like. My wife’s had three children.” I laughed, and I said, “Yeah, Buster. I’ve had three children.” He said, “Can you tell me what it’s like?” I said, “I can, yes, but it’s kind of complex. I can’t fit it in a 30‑line message slot.” I said, “I have this little thing I wrote a few months ago in which a young woman explains to her brother in some detail what it’s like to be pregnant. I’ll put it in the library here for you.” My husband says I am congenitally unable to lose an argument, and he’s right. That’s why I overcame my fear of showing what I was writing, in order to win an argument, and I did, as a matter of fact, win the argument.

But what happened was that everyone who had been following the argument went and read this piece, and they all came rushing back, and they said, “This is great. What is it?” And I said, “I don’t know.” They said, “Well, where’s the beginning?” I said, “I haven’t written that yet.” And they said, “Well, put up some more of it. This is fascinating.”

I don’t write in a straight line. I write in little bits and fit them together. Whenever I had a bit that would stand alone without too much discussion, I put it up. And people got more and more interested. They said, “This is great. Diana has a new chunk. Have you read it?” This was my first experience with the power of word of mouth, also the power of giving out free samples, which I have employed ever since.

And essentially what happened is that I was introduced to an agent who I had my eye on by a CompuServe friend who was this man’s client as well, and he said, “You’re almost ready to look for an agent. Would you like me to introduce you to so and so?” And I said, “Yes.” I wasn’t finished writing the book, but I was afraid my friend would be run over by a bus or leave CompuServe, so I said, “Yeah. Go ahead and ask him.”

So he wrote a perfectly straightforward typed letter to Perry Knowlton, who was the agent. Perry, God rest his soul, was a much older gentleman who never touched a computer in his life. So, I followed up my friend’s note with my own query letter. Mind you, my book was still not done. It said, “Dear, Mr. Knowlton, I’ve been writing and selling nonfiction by myself for several years. But now that I’m working on a novel, I understand that I need good literary representation. You’ve been recommended to me by John and these other people who all think you walk on water.” I said, “I have this very long book. I don’t want to waste your time reading it, it’s a long historical novel. Would you be willing to read excerpts from it?” I didn’t tell him it wasn’t done. Excerpts were all I had.

He very kindly called me back and gave me a heart attack and said, yes, he would read my excerpts. So, I hastily wrote a 26‑page single spaced synopsis of what I thought I knew about the rest of the story and sent it with my bundle of excerpts, and he took me. It is not usual to buy an unfinished book as a first novel, but I was very lucky. I actually finished the book six months later, gave it to him, and he sent it to five editors who he thought might like it. Within four days, three of them had called back with offers to buy it. So, he negotiated amongst them for two weeks. He emerged with a three‑book contract, and bing, I was a novelist. Like I said, it’s very humdrum.

New episodes of The Great American Read premiere September 11 through October 23 on PBS. Voting opened with the launch of the two-hour premiere episode on May 22 and continues throughout the summer, leading up to the grand finale on October 23.

Outlander tours

The Kelpies tours

Explore the famous Kelpies , the Falkirk Wheel and Callendar House in Falkirk . Normal pickup point is Edinburgh city centre . Five hour private tour around Falkirk for up to four passengers. Tours start at 10 am weekdays and 1.30 pm weekends.

kelpies falkirk tours

Explore the famous Kelpies , the Falkirk Wheel and Callendar House in Falkirk .

Tours start at 10 am weekdays and 1.30 pm weekends

Normal pickup point is Edinburgh city centre or the airport

Itinerary

  • 5 hour private tour group day trip around Falkirk
  • Explore the world famous Kelpies , a tribute to the Clydesdale horses that used to pull barges along the canals of Scotland
  • the Falkirk Wheel , a unique rotating boat lift
  • historic Callendar House featuring a working kitchen
  • Take in unique views of the historic Callendar House and Park
  • Small private group tour with a maximum of 4 people

Callendar House has just received a five-star rating from VisitScotland. The 14th century building, set within Callendar Park and opened to the public in 1996 after centuries as a family home with links to Mary Queen of Scots, has achieved the national tourism organisation’s top-quality award. The House dates back to the 14th century. Bonnie Prince Charlie was also a visitor to the house.

Scenes from hit TV series Outlander were filmed in Callendar House .

For categories including core experience, catering, hospitality, friendliness, staff efficiency and cleanliness it reached “exceptional” standard following a Quality Assurance visit.

The house is a credit to the local area and is a fantastic free day out. It features art, history, interactive fun and a warm welcome from the team, all set within beautiful parklands. Also possibly the best cakes in Falkirk in the tearoom.

The House, which sits along a stretch of the Antonine Wall, is also a member of VisitScotland’s Taste Our Best and VIP schemes. It boasts a working 19th century kitchen where costumed staff create an interactive experience for visitors and offer samples of early 1800s food as well as a museum which details the story of the house and area covering the 11th to 19th centuries.

Falkirk’s tourism offering going from strength to strength as it becomes the third five-star attraction in the area.

Our tour of Falkirk features a visit to the world famous Kelpies , the Falkirk Wheel and Callendar House.

We stop for up to an hour at each location .

Lunch and refreshments are not included . Phone 07305-294773 to make a booking or contact us online .

Midhope Castle – Outlander’s Lallybroch

Midhope Castle – Outlander’s Lallybroch

midhope castle 34
Midhope Castle

Located on the Hopetoun Estate is Midhope Castle which is the external location for fictional Lallybroch, the family home of character Jamie Fraser. Midhope Castle dates back to the 15th Century and although the exterior is relatively intact the castle is derelict inside and not open to the public . Book your Outlander tours on 07305-294773 .

Lallybroch being an important part of the Outlander story, much use is made of Midhope Castle.

Hopetoun House

Hopetoun House was designed by William Bruce and then altered and extended by William Adam, Hopetoun House is one of the finest examples of 18th century architecture in Britain.

The magnificent interiors which have remained virtually unchanged for three centuries reflect the elegance of the Georgian era and are decorated with the best period furniture, paintings, tapestries and clocks, with beautifully crafted finishes of carving, gilding and plaster work.

Sam Heughan tweets support for Trump baby blimp

Sam Heughan, the Galloway-born actor and star of one of the most popular historical dramas to be broadcast in recent years Outlander ,  upset some of his many fans by sharing a Scotsman story on the so-called “Trump baby blimp” which was paid for by UK protesters against the US president’s visit this weekend.

The giant inflatable was not allowed to fly over Donald Trump’s Turnberry golf course when he visited over the weekend. Yet when Mr Heughan, best known for playing Jacobite clansman Jamie Fraser in the hit series Outlander, retweeted The Scotsman’s coverage of the story, it proved too much for some Americans.

One replied: “I guess when that is all you have to get attention, it’s what you do. Too many actors doing this. I have no issue with them expressing themselves, but must remember they alienate. And, it would be better if they saved for their personal circle, not the accounts fans follow.”

But the actor hit back: “My job is portray every aspect of the human condition. To understand each character. To be able to empathise means I have to understand and therefore have an opinion. You want “entertainment”, I suggest you stop watching drama. Everyone is entitled to an opinion.”

Another fan tweeted: “Sam, I am disappointed that you retweeted this. No matter your opinion of the man , you should respect the office. Since you are usually so kind to others I find it strange that you would promote hatred like this.”

Mr Heughan later thanked his fans for interacting with him. “Love your support and debate is what makes us grow,” he said. “Just dislike being controlled or silenced. We live in a democracy. (I think).” Mr Trump left Scotland yesterday after spending time at his Turnberry golf course in South Ayrshire. Thousands attended protests in Edinburgh and Glasgow over the weekend against his visit.

Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/culture/tv-radio/sam-heughan-under-fire-from-angry-outlander-fans-over-trump-story-retweet-1-4769518

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle meet Outlander’s Caitriona Balfe

When Harry met Catriona …..

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle mingled with some important Irish figures during their official visit to Dublin, including President Michael Higgins, Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar, and even rugby legend Brian O’Driscoll. But the couple got to meet some TV stars too. During a garden party at the British Embassy yesterday, the Duke of Sussex was photographed sharing a laugh with Outlander‘s Caitriona Balfe, who stars as Claire Fraser on Starz’s hit drama. The Irish actress wore a burnt orange short sleeve dress for the soirée, with gold statement earrings peeking out from her blunt brunette bob.

Balfe was joined by fellow Irish actors Moe Dunford (Vikings) and Barry Keoghan (DunkirkThe Killing of a Sacred Deer) while chatting with Prince Harry. (Sadly there was no sign of Sam Heughan.) We wonder if the trio of thespians had a moment to bond with the Duchess of Sussex about her former acting career and seven-season run on Suits.

Book your Outlander tour online or on 07305-294773.